Rulings 

Rulings are written statements that apply to a taxpayer or to a small group of taxpayers. A ruling is intended to help the taxpayer interpret the statutes to which the ruling relates. Rulings are generally written in response to a request by a taxpayer or a taxpayer’s representative for clarification of the tax consequences of a specific set of circumstances. A request for a ruling must be submitted in writing to the Secretary. The request must include the taxpayer’s identification number and the details of the taxpayer’s situation, and should include any related contracts or agreements. We will not approve a ruling request by a taxpayer who is undergoing an audit. Please note that the Secretary is not required by statute to issue a ruling.  

 

You may submit a ruling request to:

 

New Mexico Taxation and Revenue Department

Attn: Cabinet Secretary

P.O. Box 630
Santa Fe, NM  87504-0630

 

To ensure that the facts presented are accurate, a taxpayer requesting a ruling is allowed  to review a draft of the ruling before we issue it. The Attorney General reviews the rulings issued by the Secretary before they  become final. When a ruling is granted, it is binding on the Department and the taxpayer to whom it is issued. You may use a ruling issued to another taxpayer as guidance for the imposition of taxes in similar situations, but a ruling is not binding on the Department in its dealings with any other taxpayer. 

 

Rulings

Ruling Number
Title

100 - Tax Administration Act
200 - Income Taxes - General
  • 200-97-2
  • Block Return
  • 210 - Income Taxes - Allocation/Apportionment of Income
    225 - Income Taxes - Personal Income Tax - Residency
    260 - Income Taxes - PIT - Low Income Comprehensive Tax Rebate
    262 - Income Taxes - PIT - Property Tax Rebate
    280 - Withholding Tax
    355 - State Tax
    401 - Gross Receipts & Compensating Tax Act
    405 - Gross Receipts & Compensating Tax Act - Transactions Of/With Governments
  • 405-98-1
  • Initial Use
  • 406 - Gross Receipts & Compensating Tax Act - Transactions Of/With Indians
    407 - Gross Receipts & Compensating Tax Act - Transactions Of/With Not-For-Profits
    410 - Gross Receipts & Compensating Tax Act - Exemptions - General
    411 - Gross Receipts & Compensating Tax Act - Exemptions - Agriculture
    412 - Gross Receipts & Compensating Tax Act - Exemptions - Natural Resources
    420 - Gross Receipts & Compensating Tax Act - Deductions - General
  • 420-93-1
  • Software
  • 422 - Gross Receipts & Compensating Tax Act - Deductions - Interstate Commerce
    430 - Gross Receipts & Compensating Tax Act - Deductions - Property
    431 - Gross Receipts & Compensating Tax Act - Deductions - Manufacturing
    432 - Gross Receipts & Compensating Tax Act - Deductions - Agriculture
    440 - Gross Receipts & Compensating Tax Act - Deductions - Leasing
    450 - Gross Receipts & Compensating Tax Act - Deductions - Services - General
    452 - Gross Receipts & Compensating Tax Act - Deductions - Services for Resale
    453 - Gross Receipts & Compensating Tax Act - Deductions - Services for Resale
    455 - Gross Receipts & Compensating Tax Act - Deductions - Advertising
    456 - Gross Receipts & Compensating Tax Act - Deductions - Financial Services
    457 - Gross Receipts & Compensating Tax Act - Deductions - Transportation
    470 - Gross Receipts & Compensating Tax Act - NTTCs and Other Proof
    480 - Gross Receipts & Compensating Tax Act - Compensating Tax
    485 - Gross Receipts & Compensating Tax Act - Governmental Gross Receipts Tax
    490 - Local Option Gross Receipts Taxes
    495 - Investment Credit Act
    540 - Severance Taxes
    542 - Severance Taxes - Hydrocarbons
    548 - Severance Taxes - Renewable Resources
    600 - Excise Taxes
    640 - Fuel Taxes
    700 - Property Tax Code - General
    712 - Property Tax Exemptions - Head of Household and Veterans Exemptions
    714 - Property Tax Exemptions - Educational/Religious/Charitable Exemptions
    716 - Property Tax Exemptions - Governmental and indian Exemptions
    720 - Valuation and Reporting of Property - General





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